Friday, January 30, 2015

What Not to Say to an Injured Runner

When things happen to you, like an injury that is obvious, it's kind of amazing what tends to happen. Hobbling around in a walking boot is uncomfortable enough, but I have been really surprised at the responses it/I have gotten.

Complete strangers have stopped to ask me what I did to cause my injury. I've had people just stare down at my boot like it was a third boob. I've had people try to joke around, real comedians I tell ya, others like to make comments about getting a matching boot, or that it matches my outfit.

If I tell someone that it is an overuse running injury coupled with being vitamin D deficient as well as other workouts (like plyo) then I get that knowing smug look and nod then something about how running will kill you or some such crap. As if sitting around on your rear eating ho-hos and cheetos won't. But ... I digress and won't touch that tangent today.

Along with some insanely ridiculous comments, I have gotten a fair amount of advice, suggestions, feedback from friends, relatives, strangers, and other runners.

Let me preface myself before I proceed - this is all meant in fun and humor. I am not offended by those of you who've made any of the below comments, I know they were meant from the heart. This is simply me trying to find a bit of light-heartedness right now, something I've been lacking. 

But, since I've been injured, I've come up with a list of things that you should never say to an injured runner. Again, all in fun.



Things NOT to say to an injured runner:

  • Don't brag about your own running miles please. The injured runner is staring at a big fat goose egg for miles week after week knowing they'll never hit the year in miles.
  • Please oh please don't say you "only" got in x number of miles. At a certain point, an injured runner would do just about anything to say they ran a single mile.
  • Please don't proclaim anything remotely close to, "I had an awesome run." I'm glad for you. I am. Just say, "training is going well."
  • Don't suggest a list of alternate activities. Appreciated, but not the same as running. And the list is mentally stashed for desperate times I promise. 
  • Avoid complaining about running. An injured runner wouldn't care if it was a blizzard or hurricane as long as they could run.
  • Don't suggest embracing the downtime. The brain doesn't understand why it's not getting it's important zen time, not to be confused with downtime. Yes runners tend to be type A and need to learn to slow down, slow not stop.
  • Saying something like, "Yep, that running will kill ya" may very well get you injured as well. Seriously, that boot could be used as a weapon.

What would you add to this list? Or what would you say people SHOULD say?